Scotland Slowly by Sea


Scotland’s western and northern isles are a dream destination—and for many, a long-awaited return to ancestral homelands. Culture, heritage, and natural history abound here, echoes of Europe’s ancient past.

Not Included
Tour Notes
  • Appreciate Scotland’s picturesque shorelines and fascinating maritime heritage
  • Visit the UNESCO World Heritage Site at the Heart of Neolithic Orkney
  • Climb Mousa Broch, an almost-perfectly intact Iron Age fortification
  • Experience island life on Foula in the Shetlands
  • View the largest seabird colony in the UK at the cliffs of St. Kilda

2018 Dates:
June: 11

2018 Pricing:

Cat. 1, Quad – US$4,995
Cat. 2, Triple – US$5,995
Cat. 3, Interior Twin – US$7,295
Cat. 4, Exterior Twin – US$8,595
Cat. 5, Main Twin – US$9,595
Cat. 6, Comfort Twin – US$10,595
Cat. 7, Select Twin – US$11,595
Cat. 8, Superior Twin – US$12,595
Cat. 9, Junior Suite – US$13,595
Cat. 10, Suite – US$14,595

2019 Dates:
June: 21

2019 Pricing:

Cat. 1, Quad – US$5,495
Cat. 2, Triple – US$6,495
Cat. 3, Interior Twin – US$7,795
Cat. 4, Exterior Twin – US$9,095
Cat. 5, Main Twin – US$10,095
Cat. 6, Comfort Twin – US$11,095
Cat. 7, Select Twin – US$12,095
Cat. 8, Superior Twin – US$13,095
Cat. 9, Junior Suite – US$14,095
Cat. 10, Suite – US$15, 095

Discovery Fund Fee: US$250

Prices are quoted in US$, per person based on four people sharing a quad cabin, three people in a triple cabin, two people sharing a twin cabin and one person in a single cabin. A limited number of single cabins are available in Categories 3-7 for the same per person price as the twin rates above.

Tour Code:

Open All
Day 1: Glasgow and Oban

Dubbed the Empire’s Second City, this bustling metropolis is economic engine of Scotland—and an architectural delight. Glasgow’s cathedral spires and Italianate steeples sit share the skyline with neo-gothic towers, the sensuous Art Nouveau of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the titanium, glass, and steel of this contemporary city. We then make our way to via coach Loch Lomond & the Trossachs National Park to Oban, where we will meet the Ocean Endeavour

Day 2: Islay

Known as the Queen of the Hebrides, Islay is the southernmost of the Inner Hebrides, lying just forty kilometres off the Irish coast. With a climate warmed by the Gulf Stream, the island is a haven for a variety of bird species. The capital of Islay is Bowmore, home of the Bowmore Round Kirk and one of the island’s seven renowned whisky distilleries.

Day 3: Iona and Staffa

Not far from Mull, the isle of Staffa is noted for its remarkable geography, including basaltic formations and numerous caves. The most famous of these is ‘Fingal’s Cave’, a spectacular natural feature named for the Celtic hero. Originally known in Gaelic as “the melodious cave”, it provided the inspiration for Mendelssohn’s overture, the Hebrides. Nearby Iona is where St. Columba established his monastery—the luminary of all the Caledonian Region in 563 AD. Iona was traditionally the burial place of kings and it long enjoyed the patronage of the Lord of the Isles. The restored Iona Abbey complex preserves two outstanding eighth-century crosses and a splendid collection of sculptures commissioned or influenced by the Chiefs of Clan Donald and their allies. En route to the Isle of Skye, we sail by the bird cliffs at Lunga, where razorbills, guillemots, and puffins make their nests.

Day 4: Isle of Skye

Our visit to Skye will sail along the southwestern shore as we visit Loch Coruisk, a freshwater loch only metres above sea level accessed through Loch Scavaig. Some maintain that this remote loch is one of the finest mountainscapes in all of Britain, set against a stunning backdrop formed by the Cuillin Mountains. We’ll hike the western shore of Loch Coruisk, making this day a superb stop for birders, hikers, and photographers.

Day 5: Mingulay, Outer Hebrides

The Outer Hebrides form a long archipelago off Scotland’s west coast and are the stronghold of Gaelic culture and language. Mingulay, however, while home to puffins, guillemots, kittiwakes, shags, fulmars, and razorbills, is uninhabited by humans. All the better for sightings of eagles and peregrine falcons. A large natural arch and dramatic sea stacks adorn the western side of this lovely island, which also served as inspiration for the noted tune, “Mingulay Boat Song”.

Day 6: St. Kilda

The archipelago known as St. Kilda was inhabited until 1930 when the population was forced to request evacuation. Dramatic and mystical, lying sixty-four kilometres west of the Outer Hebrides, St. Kilda is now a World Heritage Site, home to an abundant population of seabirds, notably Puffins, Fulmars and the largest gannet colony in Britain. Also at home here are unique feral sheep left by the departing islanders. St. Kilda features many examples of houses, cleits (stone storage structures) and prehistoric remains. A hike to 274-metre cliffs offers a stunning ocean vista.

Day 7: Isle of Lewis

Farther north lies Lewis, the largest of the Hebrides, the home of Harris Tweed and Scotland’s largest Gaelic speaking community. We’ll visit Stornoway, the island’s capital city. On the west side, Callanish—an ancient configuration of standing stones—is one of Britain’s most important Stone Age sites. Local tradition tells the story of giants who refused to be converted to Christianity, and were turned to stone as punishment by Saint Kieran.

Day 8: Kirkwall, Orkney

We’ll have an early morning sail past the Old Man of Hoy, a distinctive 137-metre sea stack, a red sandstone pillar atop a plinth of igneous basalt on the west coast of the isle of Hoy. Incredibly, the crumbling monolith has separated from the nearby headland only in recent centuries.

Continuous occupation by Stone Age peoples, Picts, Vikings, and Gaels make Orkney one of the richest archaeological areas in the UK. We’ll visit the 4,000-year-old Ring of Brodgar, one of Europe’s finest ancient Neolithic monuments, and the also-nearby Maes Howe, a chambered cairn estimated to have been constructed around 2700 BC. Both form a part of the Heart of Neolithic Orkney unesco World Heritage site.

Kirkwall is a fine country town dominated by the massive Magnus Cathedral, dating from 1137. It is one of the best examples of its kind in Britain and the final resting place of Orkney-born Canadian Arctic explorer, John Rae. Orkney has strong links to the Hudson’s Bay Company. From the early days of the HBC, their ships regularly called at Stromness for supplies and labour. By the late eighteenth century, three quarters of the HBC ‘s workforce in Canada, as well as many workers with the Canadian Pacific Railway, were Orcadians.

Day 9: Foula and Papa Stour

Papa Stour, with its amazing caves, blowholes, and sea stacks, has a population of under twenty souls, though marine and bird life flourishes there. Erosion of volcanic rock has created geologic wonders here, including high cliffs, caves, sea stacks, and blowholes. There are numerous Neolithic burial sites on the island, as well as Norse Ruins. The island is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and the neighbouring seas, a Special Area of Conservation.

Found twenty-three kilometres west of the Shetland Islands, Foula is the most remote permanently inhabited island in the UK. Here, a few dozen folk make their homes, many preserving traditional methods of agriculture and subsistence—yet most have access to the Internet in their crofts. Known for its 365-metre cliffs, Foula is popular with birders looking to see Arctic terns, red-throated divers and great skuas.

Day 10: Mousa

The isle of Mousa, in addition to being a fine birding island, Mousa is the site of the best preserved broch in the world. These fortified structures are unique to Scotland. We’ll explore the twelve-metre-high monument and climb the inner staircase. Its precise function is a matter of debate and a potent source of speculation.

Day 11: Aberdeen

The Ocean Endeavour arrives in Aberdeen in the morning. You can choose to extend your cruise by booking on our North Atlantic Saga cruise, stay and spend some time in this northeastern Scottish city, or fly on to your next destination or back home.

Itinerary details are subject to change based on weather conditions and visits to particular communities cannot be guaranteed.

  • Eleven days of on-board accommodation in the cabin category booked
  • Shipboard meals, afternoon tea, 24-hour coffee, tea and snacks
  • Hors d’ouevres and snacks during evening recaps
  • Expertise and guidance of expedition staff
  • On-board educational programming and interactive workshops
  • Evening entertainment
  • Nikon Camera Trial Program
  • Sightseeing including museum entries, park access and port taxes
  • Zodiac tours
  • On-site archaeology workshops
  • Local community-based performances, presentations and demonstrations
Not Included
  • Commercial flights to Glasgow, from Aberdeen
  • Mandatory medical / evacuation insurance
  • Additional touring options such as bicycle rentals
  • Personal expenses
  • Additional expenses in the event of delays or Itinerary changes
  • Discretionary gratuities to ship’s crew (suggest US$15 per passenger, per day)
  • Visas, or inoculations, if required
  • Possible fuel surcharges as assessed by the cruise company
  • $250 Discovery Fund Fee
Tour Notes

In Medieval times, an already-archaic society in the Hebrides evolved into the Lordship of the Isles, a sea-kingdom blending Gael and Viking under the powerful domination of Clan Donald. In the north, Orkney and Shetland were wed into a formidable Scandinavian earldom. Both island groups preserve some of the oldest monuments in Europe, dating back to the Stone Age. Kinship and community are two of the constants in this story; Gaelic-speaking clans retained their independence despite acknowledging the Lords of the Isles, while free Norse landholders battled the forces of feudalism in the Northern Isles.

Aboard the Ocean Endeavour, we’ll enjoy contemporary comforts as we explore our way out from Glasgow, through the western isles and the Pentland Firth to Orkney and Shetland. Abundant ecology and spectacular geology beckon adventurers for a closer look. June is an ideal month to visit Scotland in search of birds, with breeding well underway, and avian enthusiasts will be rewarded with excellent opportunities. Photographers will be in their glory amid the gorgeous scenery; small-group tutorials will help shutterbugs capture the experience at its finest.

Island folk have always been extremely conscious of the natural environment, as its bounty has sustained them. We’ll experience a bit of island life too—with music and laughter in community halls and local pubs. Though modern touches grace many homes, the people who live here still remain close to their roots, tracing traditions to the original settlers who first made their homes here centuries ago.

Singles: Free single supplement! Singles get their own cabin in categories 3-7 aboard the Ocean Endeavour at no additional cost–subject to availability.

Multiple expedition savings: Book multiple expeditions with Adventure Canada in a single calendar year aboard the Ocean Endeavour and receive 10% off the total berth cost of Arctic itineraries and 20% off the total berth cost of east coast itineraries!

30 Under 30: Save 30% on the berth cost of travellers under thirty aboard Ocean Endeavour expeditions!

Children & Infants: Children under two travel for free, and children between two and four pay for charter flights only!

To check availability for any of these special offers and applicable terms and condition, just give us a call!

Disclaimer: We do our utmost to ensure that information posted on our website is correct at the time of publication, however trip details are subject to change without notice by the suppliers and operators involved. We update the information as soon as possible when changes are advised to us, however, we cannot assume responsibility for such changes made by the suppliers and operators.